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  • Margot Savoy, MD, MPH, FAAFP, FABC, FAAPL, CPE, CMQ

    Dr. Margot Savoy Offers Insight to USA Today for Article on CDC Findings on Influenza Hospitalization and Vaccination

    Margot Savoy, MD, MPH, FAAFP, FABC, FAAPL, CPE, CMQ, Adjunct Associate Professor of Family and Community Medicine and Adjunct Associate Professor of Urban Bioethics and Population Health at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, offered insight for a USA Today article on findings by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) which showed that Black, Hispanic and Native American people continue to be more likely to be hospitalized with the flu and less likely to be vaccinated against it.

  • Dr. Parth Rali profile picture.

    Dr. Parth Rali Participates in Video Interview with American Journal of Managed Care on Pulmonary Embolism

    Parth M. Rali, MD, Associate Professor of Thoracic Medicine and Surgery at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University and Director of Fellowship Wellness and Social Media, Pulmonary and Critical Care Fellowship, at Temple University Hospital, participated in a video interview with the American Journal of Managed Care on pulmonary embolism and the clinical trials examining therapies for the condition.

  • Dr. Leah Croll

    Dr. Leah Croll Joins ABC’s World News Tonight to Discuss NFL’s New Concussion Protocols

    Leah Croll, MD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurology at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, joined ABC’s World News Tonight to discuss the NFL’s new concussion protocols.

  • Paula Umaña

    Hope Center’s Paula Umaña Interviewed for Chronicle of Higher Education Report

    Paula Umaña, Director of Community Impact for the Hope Center for College, Community and Justice at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, was interviewed for a Chronicle of Higher Education report about the role colleges are playing in helping students secure their basic needs in a post-COVID campus environment.

  • Dr. Khalili looking into a microscope

    Wired Magazine Interviewed Drs. Kamel Khalili, Tricia Burdo About Their Breakthrough Gene-Editing Therapy Being Administered to a Human with HIV for the Frist Time

    In a major milestone in the search for a cure for HIV/AIDS, a breakthrough gene-editing therapy for HIV infection now being tested in clinical trials has been administered to a human with HIV for the first time. The trial, designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of EBT-101, a one-of-a-kind gene-editing treatment, is the product of a collaborative effort between researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University and Excision BioTherapeutics, Inc. The launch of the EBT-101 Phase 1/2 clinical trial was made possible by research led by Kamel Khalili, PhD, Laura H. Carnell Professor and Chair of the Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Inflammation; Director of the Center for Neurovirology and Gene Editing; and Director of the Comprehensive NeuroAIDS Center, and Tricia H. Burdo, PhD, Professor and Vice Chair in the Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Inflammation at the Katz School of Medicine. Wired interviewed Dr. Khalili and Dr. Burdo and highlighted their research over the years that led to this news.

  • Dr. Amy Goldberg

    Dr. Amy Goldberg Named Dean of the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University

    Following a national search, Amy J. Goldberg, MD, FACS, has been appointed dean of the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University. Dr. Goldberg, the George S. Peters, MD and Louise C. Peters Chair and Professor of Surgery at the Katz School of Medicine and Surgeon-in-Chief of Temple University Health System, has served in this role in an interim capacity for the last 18 months. Dr. Goldberg, a 30-year Temple veteran, was the first woman to serve as Temple’s chair of surgery (2015) and now the first to serve as medical school dean. Multiple media outlets, including the Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia Business Journal and the Temple News, covered the news.

  • Kamel Khalili, PhD staring in a microscope

    Scienmag Highlight the Role of Drs. Kamel Khalili, Tricia Burdo and Their Teams at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine in Breakthrough Gene-Editing Therapy Being Administered to a Human with HIV for the First Time

    In a major milestone in the search for a cure for HIV/AIDS, a breakthrough gene-editing therapy for HIV infection now being tested in clinical trials has been administered to a human with HIV for the first time. The trial, designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of EBT-101, a one-of-a-kind gene-editing treatment, is the product of a collaborative effort between researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University and Excision BioTherapeutics, Inc. The launch of the EBT-101 Phase 1/2 clinical trial was made possible by research led by Kamel Khalili, PhD, Laura H. Carnell Professor and Chair of the Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Inflammation; Director of the Center for Neurovirology and Gene Editing; and Director of the Comprehensive NeuroAIDS Center, and Tricia H. Burdo, PhD, Professor and Vice Chair in the Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Inflammation at the Katz School of Medicine. 6ABC and Scienmag highlighted the news.

  • Dr. Grace Ma

    Philadelphia Inquirer Interviews Dr. Grace Ma for Article about Health Disparities and Barriers to Health Care Faced by Asian-Americans

    Grace X. Ma, PhD, Associate Dean for Health Disparities, Founding Director of the Center for Asian Health and Laura H. Carnell Professor in the Department of Urban Health and Population Science at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, was interviewed for an article in the Philadelphia Inquirer about health disparities and barriers to health care faced by Asian-Americans. Dr. Ma was recently awarded a five-year, $4 million grant from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The grant is the first of its kind to support research that addresses the impacts of structural racism and discrimination on liver cancer and liver disease in high-risk Asian-Americans. Specifically, the research will focus on three ethnic groups – Chinese-, Korean-, and Vietnamese-Americans.

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