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  • October 20, 2014

    Temple Study Suggests a Novel Approach for Treating Non-Cardiac Chest Pain

    Chest pain doesn't necessarily come from the heart. An estimated 200,000 Americans each year experience non-cardiac chest pain, which in addition to pain can involve painful swallowing, discomfort and anxiety. Non-cardiac chest pain can be frightening for patients and result in visits to the emergency room because the painful symptoms, while often originating in the esophagus, can mimic a heart attack. Current treatment — which includes pain modulators such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) — has a partial 40 to 50 percent response rate in alleviating symptoms.

  • October 16, 2014

    Leading Lung Health Organizations Release First-Ever Evidence-Based Patient Care Guidelines in Prevention of Acute Exacerbations of COPD

    The American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) and the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) announced today the release of Prevention of Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: American College of Chest Physicians and Canadian Thoracic Society Guideline in the journal CHEST.

  • October 08, 2014

    Temple's Tasuku Akiyama, PhD, Earns Research Award from International Association for the Study of Pain

    Tasuku Akiyama, PhD, Assistant Professor of Dermatology and Anatomy & Cell Biology at Temple University School of Medicine, and a researcher at the Temple Itch Center, has been awarded the 2014 Ronald Dubner Research Prize by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP). Dr. Akiyama received the prestigious award October 7 at the IASP 15th World Congress on Pain in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

  • October 07, 2014

    Temple's John Krouse, MD, PhD, Named Editor-in-Chief of Leading Medical Journal

    John Krouse, MD, PhD, Professor and Chair of the Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery and Associate Dean for Graduate Medical Education at Temple University School of Medicine, was recently named Editor-in-Chief of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery – the official peer-reviewed publication of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. Dr. Krouse has served as an Associate Editor of the journal for nine years.

  • October 01, 2014

    Dr. Won Han Appointed Executive Vice Chair for Clinical Affairs in the Department of Medicine at Temple

    Won Han, MD, has been appointed Associate Professor of Medicine and Executive Vice Chair of Clinical Affairs in the Department of Medicine at Temple University School of Medicine, effective October 1, 2014. As Executive Vice Chair, Dr. Han will provide administrative oversight to ensure the effective operation of clinical services in the Department of Medicine.

  • September 25, 2014

    Temple Director of Aortic and Endovascular Surgery to Chair Meeting of International Society of Endovascular Specialists

    Grayson H. Wheatley, III, MD, FACS, Director of Aortic and Endovascular Surgery at Temple University Hospital, and Associate Professor of Surgery at Temple University School of Medicine (left), is serving as Conference Chairman for the International Society of Endovascular Specialists' Mid-Atlantic Aortic Symposium on Saturday, September 27, in Philadelphia. The Symposium is being held at the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown.

  • September 25, 2014

    Collaborative Insights: 3rd Annual Temple Translational Science Symposium

    Over 120 post-doctoral and graduate student researchers presented posters and discussed their research on a broad assortment of scientific subjects at the Temple University School of Medicine (TUSM) and Fox Chase Cancer Center (FCCC) Third Annual Temple Translational Science Symposium, an all-day event held on September 18th in the Medical Education and Research Building.
     
    Joined by hundreds more scientists, clinicians, administrators, students, and visitors, they exchanged ideas, pondered implications, and explored future directions for their research.
     

  • September 22, 2014

    Researchers Identify Brain Areas Activated by Itch-Relieving Drug

    Areas of the brain that respond to reward and pleasure are linked to the ability of a drug known as butorphanol to relieve itch, according to new research led by Gil Yosipovitch, MD, Professor and Chair of the Department of Dermatology at Temple University School of Medicine (TUSM), and Director of the Temple Itch Center. The findings point to the involvement of the brain's opioid receptors—widely known for their roles in pain, reward, and addiction—in itch relief, potentially opening up new avenues to the development of treatments for chronic itch.
     

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