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  • Temple's John Krouse, MD, PhD, Named Editor-in-Chief of Leading Medical Journal

    John Krouse, MD, PhD, Professor and Chair of the Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery and Associate Dean for Graduate Medical Education at Temple University School of Medicine, was recently named Editor-in-Chief of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery – the official peer-reviewed publication of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. Dr. Krouse has served as an Associate Editor of the journal for nine years.

  • Dr. Won Han Appointed Executive Vice Chair for Clinical Affairs in the Department of Medicine at Temple

    Won Han, MD, has been appointed Associate Professor of Medicine and Executive Vice Chair of Clinical Affairs in the Department of Medicine at Temple University School of Medicine, effective October 1, 2014. As Executive Vice Chair, Dr. Han will provide administrative oversight to ensure the effective operation of clinical services in the Department of Medicine.

  • Temple Director of Aortic and Endovascular Surgery to Chair Meeting of International Society of Endovascular Specialists

    Grayson H. Wheatley, III, MD, FACS, Director of Aortic and Endovascular Surgery at Temple University Hospital, and Associate Professor of Surgery at Temple University School of Medicine (left), is serving as Conference Chairman for the International Society of Endovascular Specialists' Mid-Atlantic Aortic Symposium on Saturday, September 27, in Philadelphia. The Symposium is being held at the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown.

  • Collaborative Insights: 3rd Annual Temple Translational Science Symposium

    Over 120 post-doctoral and graduate student researchers presented posters and discussed their research on a broad assortment of scientific subjects at the Temple University School of Medicine (TUSM) and Fox Chase Cancer Center (FCCC) Third Annual Temple Translational Science Symposium, an all-day event held on September 18th in the Medical Education and Research Building.
     
    Joined by hundreds more scientists, clinicians, administrators, students, and visitors, they exchanged ideas, pondered implications, and explored future directions for their research.
     

  • Researchers Identify Brain Areas Activated by Itch-Relieving Drug

    Areas of the brain that respond to reward and pleasure are linked to the ability of a drug known as butorphanol to relieve itch, according to new research led by Gil Yosipovitch, MD, Professor and Chair of the Department of Dermatology at Temple University School of Medicine (TUSM), and Director of the Temple Itch Center. The findings point to the involvement of the brain's opioid receptors—widely known for their roles in pain, reward, and addiction—in itch relief, potentially opening up new avenues to the development of treatments for chronic itch.
     

  • Misha Mutizwa, MD, Appointed Assistant Professor of Dermatology and Director of HIV Dermatology at Temple

    Misha Mutizwa, MD, has been appointed Assistant Professor of Dermatology at Temple University School of Medicine, and Director of HIV Dermatology at Temple University Hospital. He will also serve as Associate Director of the Dermatology Residency Program.
     
    Dr. Mutizwa specializes in general dermatology and complex medical dermatology, with his primary clinical and research interests being HIV/AIDS-related dermatoses and inpatient dermatology. He will see patients at multiple sites within the Temple Health network.
     

  • Misha Mutizwa, MD, Appointed Assistant Professor of Dermatology and Director of HIV Dermatology at Temple

    Misha Mutizwa, MD, has been appointed Assistant Professor of Dermatology at Temple University School of Medicine, and Director of HIV Dermatology at Temple University Hospital. He will also serve as Associate Director of the Dermatology Residency Program.
     
    Dr. Mutizwa specializes in general dermatology and complex medical dermatology, with his primary clinical and research interests being HIV/AIDS-related dermatoses and inpatient dermatology. He will see patients at multiple sites within the Temple Health network.
     

  • Temple University Researchers Identify a New Target for Treating Heart Failure

    As a heart fails, losing its ability to squeeze blood through the circulatory system, the body releases a neurohormone that interferes with the heart's best chance to improve contractility, a team of Temple University School of Medicine researchers show in a study published September 9 in the American Heart Association journal, Circulation.
     

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